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31 Beautiful Peony Arrangements

In the words of author Jane Eastoe, "In our fast-paced world, there is nothing more therapeutic than a little peony gazing."

Click the arrows (or swipe if on a mobile device) to see all 31 peony arrangements.

A decorative vignette in Gavin Duke's foyer features pink peonies filling a blue-and-white porcelain bowl, sitting on a stack of books. A pair of porcelain dogs and blue-and-white vases flank either side. In the background is an ornate gilt mirror. The reflection reveals a crystal chandelier and an open, natural wood front door. the walls are painted a soothing cool white.
Pink peonies from The Tulip Tree in Nashville fill a blue-and-white chinoiserie bowl in the home of Lorie and Gavin Duke. “I always have to have fresh flowers in the house,” says Lorie. “They instantly make me happy.”
Zeze Peony Arrangement
Complex color combinations are key to floral designer Zezé’s style. In an arrangement from his upstate New York farm, he combines peonies, irises, beauty bush, Rosa glauca, and honeysuckles with Oriental poppies. Photo by Rob Cardillo
Suzanne Rheinstein, peonies
"These wonderful peonies were a bright coral color that gradually turned this pale shade. Making your own table garden with peonies or whatever you like in small vases is amusing to arrange and gives the table a more relaxed air," says interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein.
Floral design by The French Potager featuring spring flowers in a concrete cast bust
A bright pink ‘Jacorma’ peony draws our eye in an artful composition by Martha Whitney Butler, who owns the The French Potager in Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi. “A beautiful container can inspire you to flower your home on a regular basis, not just on special occasions,” she says of the concrete bust-shaped vessel from the Abbott Collection. See step-by-step instructions. Photo by Sara Essex Bradley

Lush arrangements of peonies, garden roses, lady’s mantle, delphinium, chamomile, and lilac set the tone for an alfresco party at the home of designer Meg Braff. The porcelain cabbage tureen used as a vase is by Vladimir Kanevsky. Photo Brooke Slezak

When Flower magazine photographed Pineapples, Palms, Etc., an interior design shop owned by sisters Lisa Peterson and Shelly Bascetta in Jupiter, Florida, we asked the renowned Palm Beach floral design firm Renny & Reed to create arrangements to complement the shop’s dreamy vignettes. Here, hydrangeas and peonies adorn a coffee table. Photo by Carmel Brantley

If you're looking for creative gift wrapping ideas, try re-creating this wrapped gift box with fresh flowers tucked into the ribbon

Use this gift wrapping idea for a bridal shower or a best friend’s birthday. All you need is wrapping paper, ribbon, and an assortment of fresh blooms such as peonies, gloriosa lilies, and scabiosa. See Jessica Cohen's video tutorial.

A mass of peonies, delphiniums, stock, and roses arranged by the late British floral designer Jane Packer is one of our all-time favorites. It appears in her classic book, At Home with Flowers. Photo courtesy of Ryland Peters & Small
Alicia and Adam Rico, the husband-and-wife team behind Bows and Arrows, both have a degree in painting, which influences their floral designs. In the foyer of a Highland Park home decorated by Cathy Kincaid, open petals of ‘Coral Charm’ peonies have a gradation of color, which the duo prefers as opposed to materials in saturated hues that look “straight out of the tube,” says Alicia. Photo by Stephen Karlisch
P. Allen  Smith Peonies
P. Allen Smith filled glass bottles with simple bunches of garden-grown peonies in various shades of pink and scattered them along a table at Moss Mountain Farm, his Arkansas farm. See his Peony Library for growing tips and more. 
"Anne Vitchen is the grande dame of flowers at the prestigious Ritz Paris. You can see her brilliant eye on display throughout the iconic hotel, but my favorite piece is always in the library," says American floral designer Laura Dowling. Here, Anne used peonies, roses, and a floating layer of gloriosa lilies. Photo by Erik Kvalsvik
This graceful arrangement of peonies, scabiosas, and coral bell foliage and flowers from Nicolette Owen seems to follow Constance Spry’s classic advice to “let the flowers remind you of how they looked when growing.” Photo by Gnoc Minh Ngo
For a ladies lunch, interior designer Elaine Griffin topped plates with vibrant peonies to echo the bright colors of a Lilly Pulitzer fabric used as the tablecloth. The Vine Garden Market created the lush arrangements. Photo by Julia Lynn
Willow Crossley describes this arrangement as “an ombré peony river running down the table.” To create the effect, she clustered together numerous little milk bottles. Photo by Emma Mitchell
Arrangement by floral designer Kirk Whitfield of K & Co Flowers with off-white ‘Butterfly’ double ranunculus, peonies, blue tweedia, sclepia (milkweed), and lyschimia
‘Butterfly’ double ranunculus, tweedia, asclepia (milkweed), and lysimachia (gooseneck loosestrife) complement fluffy pink peonies in a simple arrangement by floral designer Kirk Whitfield of K & Co Flowers. “I wanted to explore colors that one might not necessarily consider using together. Texture helps bring the palette together,” she says. See step-by-step instructions. Photo by Laurey Glenn
Event designer Mary Ruth Miller of Gathering Events in Charleston, South Carolina, created a mantel arrangement using ‘Coral Charm’ peonies, ranunculus, godetia, dichelostemma ‘Red Princess,’ huckleberry, holly fern, and philodendron. See more from this peony-themed party. Photo by Gayle Brooker
Laura Dowling bouquet; view of the Eiffel tower
Laura Dowling used silk ribbon to finish her exuberant Moulin Rouge bouquet of burgundy peonies, black dahlias, lady’s mantle, and pistachio foliage. The spiral structure of a French-style bouquet allows it to stand unassisted on the Alexander III Bridge in Paris. Photo by Erik Kvalsvik
Step 12: finish the floral arrangement with white tulips

‘Coral Charm’ peonies make such a statement that you only need a few,” says New Orleans floral designer Destiny Pinson of Doris Ione. See step-by-step instructions. Photo by Sara Essex Bradley

peony arrangement by Ingrid Carozzi
Ingrid Carozzi notes, "I try to look at the timeless versus trends as much as possible. In both floral design and as a general way of living, I like things that last a long time." She captures a timeless beauty in this arrangement of peony, ranunculus, sweet peas, and lisianthus. Photo by Paul Brissman
A sunny arrangement of peonies, dahlias, alliums, hellebores, and ‘Beatrice’ garden roses mirrors the golden tones in the Pierre Frey Bengali wallpaper and the Lisa Fine fabric patterns Rambagh and Baroda II. Floral design by Bows and Arrows. Interiors by Cathy Kincaid. Photo by Stephen Karlisch
event design lecture, table setting with peonies and shells

Rebecca Gardner, an event designer and founder of the online shop Houses & Parties, filled a compote with a variety of peonies in hot pink hues, which brings a pop of color to a beachy table setting adorned with shells.

The designers at Studio Choo in San Francisco chose a low box to hold a profusion of peonies, poppies, viburnum berries, and flowering oregano—a lovely arrangement that will surely start a conversation at the table, not block it. Photo by Paige Green
Parisian florist Catherine Muller stands on a brick-lined street in front of towering wooden double doors painted pale blue. She looks slightly away from camera and smiles, holding a profuse French bouquet of pink and white blooms, with the stems wrapped in a trailing floral fabric
Parisian florist Catherine Muller, a mentor to American floral designer Laura Dowling, holds a massive spring bouquet of peonies and roses. Photo by Erik Kvalsvik
Rowan Blossom holding a blue-and-white bowl of flowers in shades of pink
'Sarah Bernhardt' peonies grace this lavish arrangement by London designer Rowan Blossom in her book Living with Flowers: Blooms & Bouquets for the Home (Laurence King, 2019). See step-by-step instructions. 
A glorious spring arrangement of quince branches, peonies, lisianthus, fringed tulips, lilacs, sweet peas, scabiosas, and eucalyptus from Philadelphia floral designer, Sullivan Owen. Photo by Alison Conklin
Peony Arrangements
A garland studded with peonies looks regal in a field of yarrow at Oregon’s Hammelman Farms, one of 12 flower farms featured in Florists to the Field by Erick New and Greg Campbell, owners of Garden District in Memphis. Photo by Sarah Bell of Sélavie Photography
Tara Guérard arrangement with peonies

At a brunch party for fashion designer Lela Rose in Charleston, South Carolina, event planner Tara Guérard echoed the pretty pink and coral shades on the table in an arrangement of pink peonies, roses, ranunculus, tulips, and kumquat branches. Photo by Lucy Cuneo

peony arrangement
Amy Osaba says of this bold arrangement, "I like to use lots of different colors and textures, therefore using lots of varying types of flowers. (Here) we used peonies, ranunculus, zinnia, scabiosa, feverfew, and even some Jerusalem sage." Photo by Alecia Lauren Kowalik
‘Buckeye Belle,’ ‘Red Charm,’ and ‘Coral Charm’ peonies are a living reflection of the blooms in the Jasper Peony wallpaper by Carleton V. The drapery fabric is Gallica by Colefax and Fowler. Floral design by Bows and Arrows. Interiors by Cathy Kincaid. Photo by Stephen Karlisch

Tropical foliage, parrot tulips, gloriosa lilies, asclepias ‘Beatrix,’ viburnum, and a variety of peonies create a festive arrangement for a peony-themed party. Floral design by Gathering Events. Photo by Gayle Brooker

A dramatic arrangement by Renny & Reed features coral peonies, mathiola, tulips, amaranthus, figs, bay, magnolia, pussy willow, and grasses. Photo by Jose Villa

When we ask designers about their favorite flowers, peonies consistently top their lists. What is it about peony flowers that we find so compelling? Cultivated in China for more than 4000 years, peonies command our attention with their spectacular colors, forms and fragrances.

In the introduction to her book, Peonies (Pavilion, 2018), Jane Eastoe captures the allure of their blossoms, “It may be a frilled, flounced and curled confection—the Marie Antionette of the flower world—or blessed with a classical perfection of form like a Greek statue. As each bud unfurls it reveals a color palette of great artistry, combining the soft tones of a watercolor, vivid and intense primaries, or a mix of sugary sweetshop pastels that delight the eye. Every part of the flower contributes to this feast of visual delight.”

In the gallery above we’ve gathered more than two dozen of our favorite peony arrangements from the pages of Flower magazine and beyond. As Jane Eastoe says, “In our fast-paced world, there is nothing more therapeutic than a little peony gazing.”

By the editors of Flower magazine

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