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Cathy Graham's Drawing Desk

In a scene from the book Second Bloom: Cathy Graham’s Art of the Table by Alexis Clark, we get a glimpse inside the sunlit studio at Graham's Upper East Side town house, where she dreams up her whimsical illustrations. Work-from-Home Takeaways: Try organizing by color, as Graham has done with her pencils on open display, and bring the outside in with foliage clippings and seasonal garden blooms in bud vases or old bottles. See more on this artist, or use the arrows above to visit the next studio.

Photo by Quentin Bacon and Andrew Ingalls from Second Bloom: Cathy Graham’s Art of the Table by Alexis Clark (Vendome, 2017)
Artist Marcy Cook wearing a long Boho-style dress stands in front of her inspiration board in her studio

Marcy Cook's Tidy Cubbies

Dallas artist Marcy Cook keeps both tools and creative muses at hand and in view in a cozy home office area where there's a place for everything and everything in its place. Work-from-Home Takeaways: Create an inspiration board, and open your mind to the possibilities of open cubby storage. See floral arrangements and paintings by this artist.

Photo by Stephen Karlisch
William McLure art and interiors: A large white square coffee table, with stacks of coffee table books on art and design and a vase of lush pink blooms at the center. Framed art is propped against the wall in the background

William McLure's Artful Stacks

Artist and interior designer William McLure scours online sources from Craigslist to Chairish for one-of-a-kind finds that create an eclectic mix of high and low in his rooms. In a scene from his former loft, lounging areas mingle with eye-pleasing stacks of books that serve as sources of inspiration for his art and designs. Work-from-Home Takeaways: If you don't have storage for resource materials, a neat stack (even on the floor!) can go a long way to turning chaos into a calming space. We also love how he overcame the challenge of hanging art in an area with a large expanse of windows by simply propping framed pieces along the bottom of the wall. (The three pieces on the left are his own work.) See more on this artist/interior designer.

 Photo by Jean Allsopp
The artist hangs one of her artworks on her studio wall

Ronni Robinson's Light-Filled Retreat

Pictured in her former Philadelphia studio, artist Ronni Robinson creates floral-inspired “fossils” that make time and nature stand still. We love the natural-colored walls and curtain panels, with just enough warmth to avoid that stark studio look, as well as the soaring windows. Work-from-Home Takeaways: Set up your workstation by a window—the natural light will do you a world of good. See more on this artist.

Photo by Amy Franz
Claire Basler home studio

Claire Basler's Studio in Bloom

"At her château in the bucolic French countryside, artist Claire Basler paints sumptuous, extravagant works inspired by floral arrangements plucked from the gardens just beyond her window," says Frances McDougall, a contributing editor at Flower magazine. Work-from-Home Takeaways: While we cannot all move to our own French château, we can bring in generous bundles of blooms and foliage cut from the garden to inspire us. See more on this artist.

Photo by Dominique Bouteiller
En plein air painting in an indoor outdoor living space

Marcella Kaspar's "Plein Air" Dream House

Indoor and outdoor spaces merge in artist Marcella Kaspar's light-filled, open-air home near Coogee, Australia, where she works and lives with her husband, designer Mark Cooper. Work-from-Home Takeaways: On nice day, throw open the window, or move your work to a covered patio or porch within your wifi's reach.  See the rest of Kaspar's home.

Photo by Simon Kenny/Living Inside

By Terri Robertson

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