One of the many delights of strolling through a garden, beyond the visual is its fragrances—of the dew at dawn, freshly-cut grass, and, of course, the heavenly aroma of our flowers in bloom, especially roses. We’ve rounded up some of our favorite fragrant rose varieties that are as appealing to the nose as they are to the eye. And although a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, we dig into some of the stories behind the names. While only some have a story to tell, all of these beauties have alluring fragrances that leave us wanting more.

Meet: ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’
Fragrance Notes:
Fruity with hints of pear, grape, and citrus
Classification: English shrub rose bred by David Austin
Color: Tangerine orange
What's in a Name: Lady Emma Hamilton, a blacksmith’s daughter and former dance-hall girl, was the wife of a British ambassador and later became the lover of Horatio Nelson, a heroic British officer in the Royal Navy. Her story was later portrayed by Vivien Leigh in the film, That Hamilton Woman. The rose was dubbed after Emma to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, where Nelson met his demise.
Meet: ‘Madame Alfred Carrière’
Fragrance Notes:
 A musky fragrance
Classification: Climbing rose bred by Antique Rose Emporium
Color: Pale pink and creamy white
Meet: ‘Jubilee Celebration’
Fragrance Notes:
Bold, fruity fragrance with hints of fresh lemon and raspberry 
Classification: English shrub rose bred by David Austin
Color: Salmon pink
What's in a Name: This richly-colored rose was named to commemorate Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s golden jubilee, which occurred in 2002 and marked the 50th anniversary of her ascension to the throne.
Meet: ‘Mister Lincoln’
Fragrance Notes:
A strong melon fragrance
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Jackson & Perkins
Color: Crimson
What's in a Name: Named after one of our most respected presidents, this crimson beauty was presented, most appropriately, with All-American Rose Selections honors in 1965 for its color, shape, and sweet fragrance.
Meet: ‘Honey Perfume’
Fragrance Notes:
An irresistible spicy fragrance
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Jackson & Perkins
Color: Apricot yellow
Meet: ‘At Last’
Fragrance Notes:
A classic, perfumed rose scent
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Proven Winners
Color: Apricot orange
What's in a Name: As the name suggests, the large sunset-colored rose is the first disease-resistant rose with a strong scent for the company—and it couldn’t come soon enough!
Meet: ‘Louise Odier’
Fragrance Notes:
A strong, sweet Old Rose perfume
Classification: Shrub rose sold by Heirloom Roses, David Austin, and Antique Rose Emporium
Color: Warm, saturated pink
Meet: ‘Fragrant Cloud’
Fragrance Notes:
A bold mix of citrus, spice, fruit, and rosy damask—the overall scent has been compared to the smell of cloves or pumpkin pie
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Jackson & Perkins
Color: Coral red
Meet: ‘Constance Spry’
Fragrance Notes:
A strong scent of myrrh
Classification: English shrub rose bred by David Austin
Color: Deep pink
What's in a Name: One of the first David Austin roses, this British beauty was named after the grande dame of floral design. Constance Spry hit her stride in the 1920s, and changed the game of floral design by embracing the practice of loose, fluid arrangements. She pioneered the use of unorthodox materials (or at least what was considered unorthodox at the time) such as weeds, fruits, vegetables, and berries. Armed with a love of gardening and uninhibited imagination, she went on to be a best-selling author and an authority on creating exquisite arrangements.
Meet: ‘Alba’
Fragrance Notes:
Sweet clove with a hint of citrus
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Monrovia
Color: Snowy white
Meet: ‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’
Fragrance Notes:
A damask perfume fragrance
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Antique Rose Emporium
Color: Pale pink
What's in a Name: Introduced in 1843, this rose was originally called ‘Queen of Beauty and Fragrance.’ It grew in the gardens that Josephine Bonaparte (the wife of Napoleon) established at Malmaison in France, which once housed one of the largest collections of roses in the world. The rose’s name was changed to honor the estate when one of the Grand Dukes of Russia obtained a specimen for the Imperial Gardens of Russia.
Meet: ‘Ambridge’
Fragrance Notes:
A strong myrrh scent, reminiscent of aniseed
Classification: English shrub rose bred by David Austin
Colors: Apricot, peach, orange, and copper
Meet: ‘Julia Child’
Fragrance Notes:
Licorice and spice
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Weeks Roses
Color: Butter yellow
What's in a Name: Julia Child, an American who found her passion while living abroad, was a master chef who shared the art of French cooking through her television series and award-winning cookbooks. Before her passing in 2004, the Queen of French Cuisine herself selected this bushy rose as her namesake.
Meet: ‘Madame Isaac Pereire’
Fragrance Notes:
 A musky fragrance
Classification: Shrub rose bred by Antique Rose Emporium
Color: Fuchsia
What's in a Name: An old Bourbon rose also referred to as ‘Le Bienheureux de la Salle,’ this lovely lady was introduced in 1881 and named after the wife of a wealthy French banker.
Meet: ‘Heritage’
Fragrance Notes:
 A mix of fruit, honey, and carnation with a hint of myrrh
Classification: English shrub rose bred by David Austin
Color: Medium pink

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