Meet Ashley Beyer, a Utah-based floral designer with a knack for creating dimensional and inviting arrangements with gradient color palettes and distinctive shapes and textures.

What’s the first thing you think about when you wake up?

Right now, my baby, Maci! She’s the last thing I think about when I fall asleep and the first thing I think about in the morning. She’s our world.

On a typical day, we can expect to find you …

In the winter months, I’m often meeting with clients and preparing for the coming wedding season. I also like to focus on personal work during these slower months so that my work can continue to evolve. I believe you should practice, practice, practice, and always keep your brain active creatively.

If you weren’t a floral designer, you might be …

I’d love to do interior design. My husband and I bought our house as a fixer upper, and we’ve enjoyed taking on projects and transforming the space.

When and where are you happiest?

I really am quite happy when I’m with flowers. There is something about creating in the silence—it allows me to be alone with my thoughts and I feel so at peace. But my happiest is when I’m with my little family. There’s nothing more important.

What’s your favorite floral trend?

I love monochromatic color palettes with lots of different variations of the same color with a mix of textures. I’m glad that color palettes have moved away from two or three colors and instead have become more of a color range.

In three words, describe your floral aesthetic:

Romantic, garden-like, dimensional.

What do you feel is your greatest achievement so far?

I think just starting. Starting is hard. It was not my personality to have the confidence to start my own business. I’ve never had the drive to work hard like I’ve had to in owning my own business. I think because of it, you take a higher sense of pride in your own work and what you put out there, because every project has your name on it. I want to be proud of everything I create.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be and why?

My husband and I have been many places in the world, and while I love many of them, our favorite place was the French countryside in Dordogne. We stayed at an Airbnb with this wonderful French couple who lived every day to its fullest. They were always visiting the local farmers market, hiking through the forests, cooking together, and just enjoying life. I’ll never forget how envious I was and still am of that slow-paced lifestyle. Maybe we’ll move there when we are old and want to retire!

FLOWER LIST:
  • 'Romantic Antike' garden roses
  • 'Distant Drums' roses
  • Ranunculus
  • Autumn eucalyptus
  • Porcelain vines
  • Bittersweet vines
  • Persimmons

"Fruit tends to be heavy both visually and physically and generally works best near the lip of your vessel. I prefer them hanging over the edge." -Ashley Beyer

FLOWER LIST:

  • ‘Evelyn’ garden roses
  • Flannel flowers
  • Autumn eucalyptus
  • Porcelain vines

"This arrangement is the simplest of the bunch. I love the roses’ cabbage-like faces, and their scent is intoxicating." 

FLOWER LIST:

  • ‘Koko Loko’ roses
  • Japanese anemones
  • Lisianthus
  • Chocolate cosmos
  • Black scabiosas
  • Ninebark
  • Pink snowberries
  • Autumn eucalyptus
  • Pomegranates

"When selecting a palette of two high-contrasting colors, look for foliage, flowers, and textural elements with subtle transitional tones that can help bring the colors together in a way that’s pleasing to the eye." 

FLOWER LIST:

  • ‘Distant Drum’ roses
  • ‘Koko Loko’ roses
  • Japanese anemones
  • Ranunculus
  • Lisianthus
  • Foxgloves
  • Hydrangeas
  • Autumn eucalyptus
  • Pink snowberries

"The monochromatic vibe of this arrangement appeals to me—the way the colors all work together to create almost one color in unison." 

FLOWER LIST:

  • ‘Honey Dijon’ roses
  • Ranunculus
  • Carnations
  • White scabiosas
  • Flannel owers
  • Blushing bride proteas
  • Tuberose
  • Autumn eucalyptus
  • Dusty miller
  • Dried rain tree pods

"I like grouping similar shades together in these subtle palettes, so that even the quiet colors can make an impact. This arrangement feels like the winter months, but at the same time feels warm and inviting."